Skip Bayless confesses to a love/hate relationship with Juicebox Jesus:

The God’s truth: I never much cared for Tebow when he played at Florida. I met him at last year’s Super Bowl, and interviewed him, only because he requested the session. I do not stay in touch with him. I’ve criticized him on air several times for the several shirtless pictures for which he has posed, criticized his post-loss comments about how football isn’t nearly as important as his missionary work and criticized him for spending too much time on self-promotion after signing with two of the biggest talent agencies in Hollywood — Creative Artists Agency and William Morris.

The astonishingly missed point:

I’VE BEEN EXTREMELY OBJECTIVE ABOUT TIM TEBOW.

And that’s my problem: I’m one of the very few commentators who have been objective about Tebow’s ability to win football games. I merely dared to say Tebow could be a successful starting quarterback in the National Football League — not a Pro Bowler, mind you, just a guy who could win games his way. Which prompted relentless attacks from anti-Tebow analysts and journalists. Which prompted me to defend my position. I wasn’t “loving” Tebow as much as I was defending him. The more I was ridiculed, the harder I fought back — always in the spirit of “give this kid a break.”

While Peter King, who will never love Tim Tebow in the deeply emotional and satisfying way that he loved Brett Favre, has a disappointment with the Jets:

Disappointment of the first quarter of the season: the invisibility of Tim Tebow.

Through four games, his underwhelming numbers:

Snaps from scrimmage — 31.
Snaps on special teams — 25.
Rushes — 9 for 38 yards, no touchdowns.
Passes — 1 of 1, 9 yards, no touchdowns, one sack.
Touches on special teams — 0.
Total — 56 plays, 47 yards rushing/passing, no TDs.

My personal favorite game of Tebow’s was the 19-snap, five-yard, one-sack performance at Miami in Week 3.

I don’t buy the Wildcat doesn’t work in the NFL anymore. Check out the production of Colin Kaepernick, the hugely less famous Wildcat quarterback/backup quarterback, in 39 fewer plays over five games: 17 plays, 88 yards (all rushing), one touchdown. (That does not include the final 12 plays of the Niners’ rout of Buffalo Sunday, in which Kaepernick replaced Alex Smith as the regular quarterback.)

If the Jets have been waiting to unveil Special Teams Timmy or Secret Weapon Timmy, tonight might be a good time, when vastly undermanned New York faces the superior Texans.

As Kurt Cobain once yowled:

Here we are now, entertain us.