When we last saw non-profit lamprey Nancy Brinker she was busy overseeing the destruction of the well-oiled Pink Machine of Fraud that she created known as the Susan G.Komen Foundation. Well, Komen hasn’t bounced back from that fiasco, but that doesn’t mean that Brinker couldn’t divert a few more dollars that could have gone to breast cancer research to her over-stuffed pink Kate Spade wallet:

Turns out that in 2011, it spent just 15 percent of its donations on research — nearly half of what it did just a few years prior. And, significantly, its founder, Nancy Brinker, the woman whose vow to the sister she lost to cancer has served as the organization’s poignant, relatable narrative, stepped down as its CEO. In August, Brinker announced she was taking on a new role, as chairwoman of the executive committee. (She is, however, still listed as its CEO and founder on the Komen site. Komen says it’s still looking for her replacement.) In short, the whole series of fiascoes was so appalling that Deanna Zandt, author of “Share This! How You Will Change the World With Social Networking,” called the Komen fiasco a teachable “example of what not to do.”

Yet after more than a year of bad publicity and declining participation, Brinker herself seems to be doing just fine. As Cheryl Hall pointed out this weekend in the Dallas Morning News, Brinker made “$684,717 in fiscal 2012, a 64 percent jump from her $417,000 salary from April 2010 to March 2011.” That’s a whole lot of green for all that pink. Hall notes that’s about twice what the organization’s chief financial officer, Mark Nadolny, or former president Liz Thompson were making. And as Peggy Orenstein points out on her blog Monday, it’s considerably more than the average nonprofit CEO salary of $132,739. 

The IRS filing states that Brinker devotes 55 hours per week to her “job” which sounds about right because, if you want to screw up an organization as monolithic as Komen, you have to put in the extra time to do it right…